5 positive commercials I love

So, I feel like I’ve been hating on the media lately. Ads have become a big part of our culture, and though their greater goal is to always promote a product or service, they also end up representing society and promoting certain ideals. Yes, many commercials and ads continue to feature negative stereotypes, but there are a few gems out there that work against the tide by showcasing diversity or promoting positive messages.  Lately, some companies have taken strides to be more mindful in their advertising and have made some pretty great commercials.

Here are some of my favorites:

1. Always: Like a Girl

I love this ad for showing how stereotypes are learned as we get older. The older subjects have already equated the words “like a girl” as an insult while the young girls simply demonstrate their skills, unfazed. The #likeagirl campaign is a great way to use social media to fight against gender stereotypes.

2. Honey Maid: Love

After Honey Maid ran an ad featuring a gay couple and their growing family, they got a lot of hate mail. But instead of bowing to the pressure and changing their approach, they stuck with the message of love and created a beautiful commercial to address the controversy.

3. Coca-Cola: America is Beautiful

I remember watching this ad during the SuperBowl last year and getting chills. I love how it shows the many different cultures, communities, languages, and families that make up our nation.

4. Cheerios: Gracie

When this family first debuted in Cheerios’ “Just Checking” commercial, so many people responded with racist comments that it sparked a national conversation and was featured on the news everywhere. But Cheerios brushed off the controversy with this comeback commercial, sticking with their desire to represent all types of families.

5. Dove: Love Your Curls

Sure, accepting your hair may seem like a small issue compared to the greater problems of our society, but the message of accepting yourself and embracing your identity shines through the curly vs. straight hair dilemma. As a curly-haired woman who woke up at 5 am everyday to straighten my hair before high school, I would’ve loved seeing this commercial as a kid. And the happiness of the girls at the end of the commercial is just so adorable.

Have any other personal favorites? Feel free to add them in the comments below!

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“We’ve been leaders, we’ve been kings…” Oyelowo on the treatment of black narratives

Wow. David Oyelowo just said it. While my recent post about the Oscar snubs focused on the lack of recognition toward females in the industry, the controversy this year has also been about the racial diversity of the nominees. Sitting down for an interview at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival, Oyelowo, who played Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in Selma, discusses why he believes he was snubbed and challenges the industry to look at how they treat black narratives.

As we start Black History Month, his message is especially meaningful and worth thinking about–why do we tolerate so many movies that depict blacks as subservient while rarely acknowledging (or even creating!) films that show them in leadership positions? As he points out, movies are typically told from the white character’s point of view. He argues that authentic narratives told from the perspective of black characters are important because “You can’t have people curating culture in this way when we need to see things in order to reform from them.”

I have to agree.

And I wonder what role the media plays when I see such disparities between how white and black people perceive society. In a PEW research study, vastly different responses between white and black citizens were found in issues of equality and racial tension.  In answer to “How much needs to be done in order to achieve racial equality?” 79% of blacks said “A lot,” while only 46% of whites answered in this way. The poll indicates that blacks feel that they are not experiencing equal treatment in almost every aspect of life, while whites do not see blacks being discriminated against. Are we really living in different worlds here or is there a serious discrepancy in what messages we are exposed to?

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Elena–Disney’s newest princess.

I hope we see and hear more diversity in our culture’s stories. Stories help build empathy and break down barriers between different groups of people. As a culture who generally loves storytelling, wouldn’t we all benefit from diverse narratives? Shouldn’t the films/tv/books we consume more closely mirror the demographics of our society?

I work in public schools and rejoice when I see children’s a book starring a character of color or featuring cultural diversity because there are still so few examples out there. I hope that the upcoming Disney film featuring a new Latina princess will do her culture and identity justice. I also hope to see more movies like Selma and Dear White People hit theaters, films that give empowered black characters the multi-faceted identities they deserve. I hope to see more women and people of color as writers and directors. Let’s continue to demand better representation of diversity across genders and races in our media while also challenging ourselves to reflect on the messages of the things we watch.