“We’ve been leaders, we’ve been kings…” Oyelowo on the treatment of black narratives

Wow. David Oyelowo just said it. While my recent post about the Oscar snubs focused on the lack of recognition toward females in the industry, the controversy this year has also been about the racial diversity of the nominees. Sitting down for an interview at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival, Oyelowo, who played Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in Selma, discusses why he believes he was snubbed and challenges the industry to look at how they treat black narratives.

As we start Black History Month, his message is especially meaningful and worth thinking about–why do we tolerate so many movies that depict blacks as subservient while rarely acknowledging (or even creating!) films that show them in leadership positions? As he points out, movies are typically told from the white character’s point of view. He argues that authentic narratives told from the perspective of black characters are important because “You can’t have people curating culture in this way when we need to see things in order to reform from them.”

I have to agree.

And I wonder what role the media plays when I see such disparities between how white and black people perceive society. In a PEW research study, vastly different responses between white and black citizens were found in issues of equality and racial tension.  In answer to “How much needs to be done in order to achieve racial equality?” 79% of blacks said “A lot,” while only 46% of whites answered in this way. The poll indicates that blacks feel that they are not experiencing equal treatment in almost every aspect of life, while whites do not see blacks being discriminated against. Are we really living in different worlds here or is there a serious discrepancy in what messages we are exposed to?

150130-latin-disney-princess-wide_54ae412a711a00615b7f8a7f6f337fb8

Elena–Disney’s newest princess.

I hope we see and hear more diversity in our culture’s stories. Stories help build empathy and break down barriers between different groups of people. As a culture who generally loves storytelling, wouldn’t we all benefit from diverse narratives? Shouldn’t the films/tv/books we consume more closely mirror the demographics of our society?

I work in public schools and rejoice when I see children’s a book starring a character of color or featuring cultural diversity because there are still so few examples out there. I hope that the upcoming Disney film featuring a new Latina princess will do her culture and identity justice. I also hope to see more movies like Selma and Dear White People hit theaters, films that give empowered black characters the multi-faceted identities they deserve. I hope to see more women and people of color as writers and directors. Let’s continue to demand better representation of diversity across genders and races in our media while also challenging ourselves to reflect on the messages of the things we watch.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s